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Financial Inclusion Data
Working Group (FIDWG)

Financial Inclusion Data
Working Group (FIDWG)

A platform dedicated to promoting and sharing practical knowledge and recommendations on financial inclusion measurements including core set indicators, measurement methodologies, policy models and other good practices by AFI member institutions.

FIDWG aims to develop a common framework for measuring financial inclusion and sharing lessons learned on topics such as target setting, quantitative and qualitative measurement methodologies, and data analysis and reporting to better inform policy-making and changes in regulation.

Members promote the adoption of a framework within the AFI network at the international level.

View the FinNeeds toolkit, a measurement framework by insight2impact. This toolkit outlines the FinNeeds indicators to track, and discusses the data sources and measurement approaches relevant for each element, as well as how to analyze the data for policy-ready insights.

61
Member
Institutions
59
Countries
86
Policy
Changes
21
Knowledge
Products

CHAIR

Alex Ochan, Bank of Uganda

CO-CHAIR

Akata Taito, Reserve Bank of Fiji

CO-CHAIR

Settor Amediku, Bank of Ghana

  • Develop a common framework for FID WG members to measure financial inclusion, including indicators and methodologies;
  • Promote the adoption of the framework at the international level
  • Share lessons learned about target setting, survey methodologies, data analysis and using data to inform policymaking.
  • Sex-Disaggregated Data Subgroup:
    Guideline Note on Sex-Disaggregated Data to collect financial inclusion sexdisaggregated data from the financial service providers (supply-side).
  • Monitoring and Evaluation Subgroup (jointly with FISPLG):
    Toolkit on Monitoring and Evaluation Framework to guide the NFIS implementation.
  • Inclusive Green Finance Subgroup:
    Special Report on Inclusive Green Finance: Demand-Side Indicators
  • RegTech Taskforce (jointly with DFS WG and GSP WG)
    Special Report on RegTech for Financial Inclusion.
    2019

  • Special Report: A client needs-centered approach to financial inclusion measurement
  • AFI Core Set Policy Model
  • Guideline Note 33: Digital Financial Services Indicators
  • 2017

  • Guideline Note 26: Sex-Disaggregated Data Toolkit
  • Guideline Note 25: Leveraging Sex-Disaggregated Data
  • 2016

  • Guideline Note 24: Financial Inclusion Data Tracking and Measurement – GIS Mapping to Inform Policymaking
  • Guideline Note 22: Indicators of the Quality Dimension of Financial Inclusion
  • Guideline Note 18: An Index to Measure the Progress of Financial Inclusion
  • 2015

  • Guideline Note 16: SME Financial Inclusion Indicators Base Set
  • 2014

  • The Use of Financial Inclusion Data: Country Case Study of the Philippines
  • The Use of Financial Inclusion Data: Country Case Study of Bangladesh
  • The Use of Financial Inclusion Data: Country Case Study of Burundi
  • The Use of Financial Inclusion Data: Country Case Study of Mexico
  • The Use of Financial Inclusion Data: Country Case Study of Peru
  • The Use of Financial Inclusion Data: Country Case Study of South Africa
  • 2013

  • Guideline Note 11: MFS Indicators for Measuring Access and Usage
  • Guideline Note 10: Financial Inclusion Data Tracking and Measurement: emand-Side Surveys to Inform Policymaking
  • Guideline Note 04: Measuring Financial Inclusion: Core Set of Financial Inclusion Indicators
  • 2011

  • Measuring Financial Inclusion: Core Indicators for Financial Inclusion
  • Case Study: Measuring financial inclusion in Mexico: CNBV’s approach to obtaining better data for decision-makers
  • 2010

  • Policy Paper: Financial inclusion measurement for regulators: Survey design and implementation
  • Banque Centrale de Mauritanie
    Demand-side survey
  • Centrale Bank van Suriname
    Demand-side survey
  • Banco Central Timor Leste
    Design of financial inclusion demand-side survey
  • SUGEF Costa Rica
    Financial Inclusion demand-side survey review
  • Ministère de l’Economie et des finances du Sénégal
    Demand-side survey of the financial inclusion situation in Senegal
  • Bank of Uganda
    Demand-side survey methodology and findings 2017 Finscope report
  • Banco Central de Reserva de El Salvador
    Demand-side financial inclusion survey
  • Bank of Ghana
    Data Framework for Guidelines on E-money Issuers
  • Central Bank of Egypt
    Financial Inclusion Measurement Framework
  • Bank of Thailand of Thai Households
  • Central Bank of Kenya
    Kenya 2013 FINSCOPE report
  • Bank of Tanzania
    Tanzania 2013 FINSCOPE report
  • Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
    National demand-side survey questionnaire
  • Bank of Uganda
    Demand-side survey methodology and findings and the Uganda 2013 FinScope report
  • Banque de la République du Burundi
    Demand-side financial inclusion survey
  • Banco Central do Brasil
    National financial inclusion report
  • CNBV Mexico
    Second national financial inclusion report
  • Bank of Zambia
    Topline findings of the FinScope Zambia 2009 survey
  • Banco Central de Reserva de El Salvador
  • Banco Central de São Tomé e Príncipe
  • Banco Central del Paraguay
  • Banco de Moçambique
  • Banco Nacional de Angola
  • Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
  • Bangladesh Bank
  • Bank Al-Maghrib
  • Bank Negara Malaysia
  • Bank of Ghana
  • Bank of Namibia
  • Bank of Papua New Guinea
  • Bank of Sierra Leone
  • Bank of Tanzania
  • Bank of Thailand
  • Bank of Uganda
  • Bank of Zambia
  • Banque Centrale de la Republique
    de Guinée
  • Banque Centrale de Mauritanie
  • Banque Centrale de Tunisie
  • Banque Centrale des Etats de l’Afrique
    de l’Ouest (BCEAO)
  • Banque Centrale du Congo
  • Banque de la République du Burundi
  • Central Bank of Armenia
  • Central Bank of Egypt
  • Central Bank of Jordan
  • Central Bank of Kenya
  • Central Bank of Liberia
  • Central Bank of Nigeria
  • Central Bank of Samoa
  • Central Bank of Solomon Islands
  • Central Bank of Sri Lanka
  • Central Bank of the Bahamas
  • Central Bank of The Gambia
  • Central Bank of the Republic of
    Uzbekistan
  • Central Bank of the Russian Federation
  • Centrale Bank van Suriname
  • Comisión Nacional Bancaria y de Valores
    de México (CNBV)
  • Da Afghanistan Bank
  • Direction Générale du Trésor, Ministère
    de l’Economie et des Finances,
    Madagascar
  • Financial Regulatory Commission of
    Mongolia
  • Maldives Monetary Authority
  • Ministère de l’Économie et des Finances
    de la Côte d’Ivoire
  • Ministère de l’Economie, des Finances
    et du Budget du Sénégal
  • Ministry of Finance – Eswatini
  • Ministry of Finance Ghana
  • Ministry of Finance Zambia
  • National Bank of Cambodia
  • National Bank of Rwanda
  • National Bank of Tajikistan
  • National Bank of the Republic of Belarus
  • National Reserve Bank of Tonga
  • Nepal Rastra Bank
  • Palestine Monetary Authority
  • Reserve Bank of Fiji
  • Reserve Bank of Malawi
  • Reserve Bank of Vanuatu
  • Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe
  • Royal Monetary Authority of Bhutan
  • Superintendencia de la Economía Popular
    y Solidaria de Ecuador
  • Superintendencia General de Entidades
    Financieras de Costa Rica (SUGEF)

Webinars

In this webinar, the speakers are highlighting key steps in designing and developing a demand-side survey: how to identify the key objectives, streamline the indicators/questions to be defined and included in questionnaires, the validation of the structure and language of the instruments, and how should the end-resulted be used for analysis and effective policy decision-making.
Financial inclusion demand-side data and specifically face-to-face demand-side surveys are considered one of the key tools to measure access, usage, and quality of services from a user’s perspective. These tools are flexible instruments that allow to measure specific characteristics, perceptions, and preferences from the financial services and products (FSP) user’s perspective.
They can capture critical information from partially and unserved markets. More recently, additional policy needs have been identified to be measured by these instruments: access, usage, quality of services, but also Micro and SME finance aspects, individual financial needs, the gender angle of financial inclusion, resilience and adaptation processes in climate emergency responses, and additional nuances linked to digital financial services and financial technology.

- Read More

In this webinar, the speakers are highlighting the main objectives, characteristics, advantages, and limitations of demand-side surveys. The webinar explained how policymakers can use surveys to inform their policies while taking advantage of other measurement tools. The tools are both from the supply and the demand side and complement the overview of the financial inclusion landscape for timely decision-making.
Financial inclusion demand-side data and specifically face-to-face demand-side surveys are considered one of the key tools to measure access, usage, and quality of services from a user’s perspective. These tools are flexible instruments that allow measuring specific characteristics, perceptions, and preferences from the financial services and products (FSP) user’s perspective. They can capture critical information from partially and unserved markets. More recently, additional policy needs have been identified to be measured by these instruments: access, usage, quality of services, but also Micro and SME finance aspects, individual financial needs, the gender angle of financial inclusion, resilience and adaptation processes in climate emergency responses, and additional nuances linked to digital financial services and financial technology.

- Read More

© Alliance for Financial Inclusion 2009-2021